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Perennial Baby’s Breath Seeds

Gypsophila paniculata

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in spring after the soil has warmed to about 70 degrees F. Press the seed into the soil’s surface, since it requires light to sprout; keep the soil moist until it germinates, which usually occurs in 10-15 days. To start indoors, sow the seed in flats 4-6 weeks before the last frost; keep the soil lightly moist until germination, and transplant the seedlings outdoors as soon as the weather allows. This plant grows well in rich, light soils.

Growing: This plant can tolerate some drought, though it grows best with regular watering as it develops and begins to bloom. Because of its extensive root system, the plant often develops rather slowly; blooming may not begin until its second or third year of growth. Cut the foliage back periodocally for new growth and reblooming. This plant will self-seed readily at the end of the season, and can become rather weedy in certain areas; cutting the foliage down to ground level after blooming will help prevent this. Do not disturb the roots or attempt to transplant. Do not allow the soil to remain damp over winter, since this can cause rotting and disease. These flowers attract bees and butterflies and resist deer.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut long stems of flowers that have just opened and place them in water immediately; strip the leaves that will fall below the water. These flowers also dry well.

Seed Saving: After blooming, each flower will develop a small round seed pod. As soon as the pods dry and contain mature black seed, shake them over a container to remove the seed. The entire plant can also be cut several inches above ground level and hung upside down, to allow the seed to fall as the plant dries.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Gypsophila paniculata

Species Origin: Eurasia

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 32,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

Reviews

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~500 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $4.80 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $6.00 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

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This dainty flower has become well-known for its role in the florists’ industry as a filler in bouquets. The first known species of this plant were sent by botanist Johann Amman to Sir Hans Sloane, a renowned collector whose extensive treasury later became an important addition to London’s Natural History Museum. The genus name "Gypsophila" means “lover of chalk,” referring to the type of light, alkaline soil that this plant prefers. After blooming, this plant comes loose from its roots and tumbles in the wind to spread its seed; it has become rather invasive in some areas, and is classified as a noxious weed in several states.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in spring after the soil has warmed to about 70 degrees F. Press the seed into the soil’s surface, since it requires light to sprout; keep the soil moist until it germinates, which usually occurs in 10-15 days. To start indoors, sow the seed in flats 4-6 weeks before the last frost; keep the soil lightly moist until germination, and transplant the seedlings outdoors as soon as the weather allows. This plant grows well in rich, light soils.

Growing: This plant can tolerate some drought, though it grows best with regular watering as it develops and begins to bloom. Because of its extensive root system, the plant often develops rather slowly; blooming may not begin until its second or third year of growth. Cut the foliage back periodocally for new growth and reblooming. This plant will self-seed readily at the end of the season, and can become rather weedy in certain areas; cutting the foliage down to ground level after blooming will help prevent this. Do not disturb the roots or attempt to transplant. Do not allow the soil to remain damp over winter, since this can cause rotting and disease. These flowers attract bees and butterflies and resist deer.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut long stems of flowers that have just opened and place them in water immediately; strip the leaves that will fall below the water. These flowers also dry well.

Seed Saving: After blooming, each flower will develop a small round seed pod. As soon as the pods dry and contain mature black seed, shake them over a container to remove the seed. The entire plant can also be cut several inches above ground level and hung upside down, to allow the seed to fall as the plant dries.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Gypsophila paniculata

Species Origin: Eurasia

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 32,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

Reviews