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Marsh Mallow Seeds

Althaea officinalis

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow the seed in late summer or early fall; the seed will remain dormant until spring. If not planted in the fall, these seeds will need to be stratified to break their dormancy. Mix the seed with an equal amount of sand and store it in the refrigerator for 4-6 weeks. Start the seeds indoors in a flat, just below the surface. Keep the soil evenly moist and at a temperature of 70 degrees F until sprouting. The germination rate may be naturally low. As soon as the seedlings can be safely handled and there is no chance of frost, transplant them.

Growing: Since this plant naturally grows in marshy ground, the plants will need to be watered well to keep the soil moist. It prefers moist to wet soil and full sun, though it also adapts to well-drained soil. Plants can also be propagated by division. A layer of mulch will help conserve moisture and control weeds. Established plants will self seed, but volunteer plants can easily be transplanted or removed. This plant attracts hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies.

Harvesting: The sweet, thick taproot of Marsh Mallow can be harvested in the autumn from plants of at least two years growth. If a few small roots are left on the plant, it will continue to grow. Eaten fresh as a vegetable, the roots have a taste similar to a parsnip. They can also be dried for later use. The leaves can be harvested individually and used fresh or dried for tea, poultices, or tinctures.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, a seed pod will develop. When the pods begin to dry and the seeds inside ripen to a brown, remove the pods individually and spread them out to dry. Separate the seed from the pods and store the cleaned seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Common Marshamllow, White Mallow

Latin Name: Althaea officinalis

Species Origin: Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 12,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~150 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $4.80 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $7.20 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $14.00 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $40.00 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $160.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $600.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Until the mid 1800s, Marsh Mallow acted as the thickening agent for the candy known as marshmallows. Confectioners would whip the juice of the root along with egg whites and sugar to make what was then a tasty medicine for children; the soothing, softening effect relieved sore throats and coughs. Other medicinal uses included poultices to reduce inflammation, a cream to soothe skin irritation, and a syrup to treat stomach ulcers or indigestion. The sweet, parsnip like root was eaten as a vegetable in ancient Rome as well as in Middle Eastern countries, being a source of food in famine. Marsh Mallow naturally grows in marshes or near sea coasts.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow the seed in late summer or early fall; the seed will remain dormant until spring. If not planted in the fall, these seeds will need to be stratified to break their dormancy. Mix the seed with an equal amount of sand and store it in the refrigerator for 4-6 weeks. Start the seeds indoors in a flat, just below the surface. Keep the soil evenly moist and at a temperature of 70 degrees F until sprouting. The germination rate may be naturally low. As soon as the seedlings can be safely handled and there is no chance of frost, transplant them.

Growing: Since this plant naturally grows in marshy ground, the plants will need to be watered well to keep the soil moist. It prefers moist to wet soil and full sun, though it also adapts to well-drained soil. Plants can also be propagated by division. A layer of mulch will help conserve moisture and control weeds. Established plants will self seed, but volunteer plants can easily be transplanted or removed. This plant attracts hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies.

Harvesting: The sweet, thick taproot of Marsh Mallow can be harvested in the autumn from plants of at least two years growth. If a few small roots are left on the plant, it will continue to grow. Eaten fresh as a vegetable, the roots have a taste similar to a parsnip. They can also be dried for later use. The leaves can be harvested individually and used fresh or dried for tea, poultices, or tinctures.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, a seed pod will develop. When the pods begin to dry and the seeds inside ripen to a brown, remove the pods individually and spread them out to dry. Separate the seed from the pods and store the cleaned seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Common Marshamllow, White Mallow

Latin Name: Althaea officinalis

Species Origin: Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 12,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

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