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Anaheim Chile Hot Pepper Seeds

Capsicum annuum

5.00 (1 reviews)
  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Start Anaheim chile hot pepper seeds indoors in peat pots about 8 weeks before the last expected spring frost. Sow them 1/4" deep and keep the soil at 80-85 degrees F until germination; provide sunlight or a grow light for 12-16 hours a day. When the outdoor temperature reaches 60-65 degrees F during the day and no less than 50 degrees F at night, transplant the seedlings 12-16" apart. Exposing the plants to the weather for several hours a day before transplanting may help prevent shock. Peppers also grow well in containers or raised beds.

Growing: Keep the soil evenly moist and weeds under control; mulching the plants may help with this. If excess heat and sun cause the plants to wilt, provide shade.

Harvesting: Harvesting hot peppers is basically a matter of personal preference. Generally, the longer the peppers mature on the vine, the hotter they will taste. Mature peppers, however, signal the plant to stop producing; if the peppers are picked when still at the green stage, the plant will go on producing. Always use a knife or scissors to remove peppers to prevent damage to the fragile stems. Anaheim peppers are known for being very versatile, and can be eaten fresh, preserved, or dried.

Seed Saving: Keep in mind that peppers will cross pollinate with other varietes of pepper, so isolation or caging may be necessary to preserve genetic purity. Allow the pepper to fully mature, than cut it open and remove the seeds. Spread out the seeds to dry for about two weeks. Store Anaheim chile hot pepper seeds in a cool, dry place for up to two years.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Capsicum annuum

Type: Open Pollinated, Heirloom, Hot Pepper, Warm Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 4,000

Planting Method: From Transplant

Sunlight: Full Sun

Height: 24 Inches

Color: Red, Green

Anaheim Chile Hot Pepper Seeds 5.0
Review By Robert Price

Good quality seed

Very happy with my purchase, looking forward to starting some seedlings.

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~50 Seeds) $3.25 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.96 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $12.00 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $27.20 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $102.00 -+
5 Lb Bulk Bag (2.27kg) $459.00 -+
10 Lb Bulk Bag (4.54kg) $816.00 Notify Me
25 Lb Bulk Bag (11.3kg) $1,938.00 Notify Me
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DESCRIPTION

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The Anaheim Chile Pepper is a classic, open-pollinated pepper variety that matures in about 80 days. The vigorous bushy upright plants provide good cover. The tapered peppers are 7" by 1.5" and dark green in color, turning red at maturity. This popular, mildly hot pepper is used for canning, drying, and fresh market. 2000 Scoville Heat Units.
An extremely popular hot pepper in Southern California and New Mexico, the Anaheim has been cultivated in New Mexico for centuries. In 1896, a entrepreneur named Emilio Ortega came to Anaheim, California to start a cannery; with him came his prize pepper variety, which soon became known and loved as the Anaheim pepper.

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Start Anaheim chile hot pepper seeds indoors in peat pots about 8 weeks before the last expected spring frost. Sow them 1/4" deep and keep the soil at 80-85 degrees F until germination; provide sunlight or a grow light for 12-16 hours a day. When the outdoor temperature reaches 60-65 degrees F during the day and no less than 50 degrees F at night, transplant the seedlings 12-16" apart. Exposing the plants to the weather for several hours a day before transplanting may help prevent shock. Peppers also grow well in containers or raised beds.

Growing: Keep the soil evenly moist and weeds under control; mulching the plants may help with this. If excess heat and sun cause the plants to wilt, provide shade.

Harvesting: Harvesting hot peppers is basically a matter of personal preference. Generally, the longer the peppers mature on the vine, the hotter they will taste. Mature peppers, however, signal the plant to stop producing; if the peppers are picked when still at the green stage, the plant will go on producing. Always use a knife or scissors to remove peppers to prevent damage to the fragile stems. Anaheim peppers are known for being very versatile, and can be eaten fresh, preserved, or dried.

Seed Saving: Keep in mind that peppers will cross pollinate with other varietes of pepper, so isolation or caging may be necessary to preserve genetic purity. Allow the pepper to fully mature, than cut it open and remove the seeds. Spread out the seeds to dry for about two weeks. Store Anaheim chile hot pepper seeds in a cool, dry place for up to two years.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Capsicum annuum

Type: Open Pollinated, Heirloom, Hot Pepper, Warm Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 4,000

Planting Method: From Transplant

Sunlight: Full Sun

Height: 24 Inches

Color: Red, Green

Reviews

5.00
Global Rating: 5.00 from 1 reviews
5.0

Review By Robert Price

Good quality seed

Very happy with my purchase, looking forward to starting some seedlings.