Free Shipping on $50+ orders!

Basket

Buffalo Grass Seeds

Buchloe dactyloides

5.00 (1 reviews)
  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow either in late fall or early spring. Plant the seed just below the surface of the soil, compacting the soil very firmly. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which usually occurs within 14-21 days.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established. This plant grows best in average, well drained soil, though it adapts to nearly any soil type including poor soil and clay. It tolerates drought, heat, and cold temperatures well. This plant makes an excellent choice for controlling erosion, as well as being a very popular choice for low maintenance and low traffic turf. For growing turf, keep in mind that the grass should never be cut lower than 2-3” high; also, water in dry weather to maintain the most attractive appearance since this plant tend to turn brown in extreme drought. This plant eventually spreads by stolons and rhizomes.

Seed Saving: At the end of the season, the female plants will develop small seed heads that eventually turn from green to tan. They can be difficult to harvest because of their location near the base of the plant’s stems. Remove the seed heads as soon as they ripen to a tan color and begin to dry; spread them out to finish drying. Separate the seeds from the husks, and store the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Buchloe dactyloides

Species Origin: US Native Grass or Sedge

Type: Native Grasses, Warm Season

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 15,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 10 Inches

5.00
Global Rating: 5.00 from 1 reviews
Buffalo Grass Seeds 5.0

Review By Charles

Buffalo Grass

I've been experimenting with this BG in the upper part of South Carolina for several years. The grass is beautiful and it tends to stay green all year. Doesn't need mowing, grows in clay soil and spreads. I only invest one ounce at a time. Spreading the seed on aerated soil give that a 3. Keeping the seed watered, my bad, give that a 3. I've tried growing my on plugs, give that a 3. I made pre planting packets from egg holders from paper egg crates, with 5 seed and 1/4 oz. of fertilizer held in by a tissue lid, give that a 3. I have some growing in a patch of Bermuda grass and it is winning the battle pushing the Bermuda aside. It comes up as a single sprout and starts spreading. This year I am going to try clear plastic mini-greenhouses held in place by U-shaped weed-fabrics spikes over the seeds to trap moisture and keep squirrels away. I usually pull crabgrasses including the roots and plant them under my water-oaks where nothing grows. Where the crab-grass was i introduce the BG.

Add your review of this product
Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~1000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $4.80 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $5.40 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $8.00 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $28.80 -+
Add to Wishlist

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

As the common name suggests, buffalo and other livestock once found this species a valuable source of forage. Settlers also made use of this plant, using its strong sod for making sod houses. Currently, its attractive, thick growth has made it a popular turfgrass. The genus name “Buchloe” comes from the Greek words for “cow grass,” while the species name “dactyloides” means “finger-like” in reference to the plant’s slender blades.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow either in late fall or early spring. Plant the seed just below the surface of the soil, compacting the soil very firmly. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which usually occurs within 14-21 days.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established. This plant grows best in average, well drained soil, though it adapts to nearly any soil type including poor soil and clay. It tolerates drought, heat, and cold temperatures well. This plant makes an excellent choice for controlling erosion, as well as being a very popular choice for low maintenance and low traffic turf. For growing turf, keep in mind that the grass should never be cut lower than 2-3” high; also, water in dry weather to maintain the most attractive appearance since this plant tend to turn brown in extreme drought. This plant eventually spreads by stolons and rhizomes.

Seed Saving: At the end of the season, the female plants will develop small seed heads that eventually turn from green to tan. They can be difficult to harvest because of their location near the base of the plant’s stems. Remove the seed heads as soon as they ripen to a tan color and begin to dry; spread them out to finish drying. Separate the seeds from the husks, and store the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Buchloe dactyloides

Species Origin: US Native Grass or Sedge

Type: Native Grasses, Warm Season

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 15,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 10 Inches

Reviews

5.00
Global Rating: 5.00 from 1 reviews
Buffalo Grass Seeds 5.0

Review By Charles

Buffalo Grass

I've been experimenting with this BG in the upper part of South Carolina for several years. The grass is beautiful and it tends to stay green all year. Doesn't need mowing, grows in clay soil and spreads. I only invest one ounce at a time. Spreading the seed on aerated soil give that a 3. Keeping the seed watered, my bad, give that a 3. I've tried growing my on plugs, give that a 3. I made pre planting packets from egg holders from paper egg crates, with 5 seed and 1/4 oz. of fertilizer held in by a tissue lid, give that a 3. I have some growing in a patch of Bermuda grass and it is winning the battle pushing the Bermuda aside. It comes up as a single sprout and starts spreading. This year I am going to try clear plastic mini-greenhouses held in place by U-shaped weed-fabrics spikes over the seeds to trap moisture and keep squirrels away. I usually pull crabgrasses including the roots and plant them under my water-oaks where nothing grows. Where the crab-grass was i introduce the BG.

Add your review of this product