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Purple Prairie Clover Seeds

Dalea purpurea

3.00 (1 reviews)
  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow the seed in early spring, planting it ¼” deep in firmly compacted soil. Keep the soil consistently moist until germination, which usually occurs within 10-12 days. Thin or transplant seedlings to 15-18” apart. To start the seed indoors, plant it ¼” deep in a flat; keep the soil at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F and consistently moist until germination. Transplant seedlings after the last spring frost or when they reach a height of several inches. This plant adapts well to sand, clay, and gravel.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established; the plant develops rather slowly because of the long tap root, which takes much of the plant’s energy in its first year. Mature plants can tolerate drought because of their long taproot, but appreciate watering in dry periods. For the healthiest growth, control surrounding weeds. This plant does not spread aggressively, and attracts bees.

Harvesting: This unusual flower makes a striking addition to flower arrangements. Cut the stems long and place them in water immediately, stripping the leaves that will fall below the water level.

Seed Saving: After the green spike finishes blooming, it will turn brown and dry. Since birds and rodents love eating this seed, it should be harvested promptly to avoid loss. Strip the heads from their stalks, holding a container underneath to catch the falling seed. The hulls do not need to be removed, but will slow germination; uncleaned seed will need to be scarified. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Violet Prairie Clover

Latin Name: Dalea purpurea

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 17,500

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 24 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Attracts Butterflies, Cut Flowers

3.00
Global Rating: 3.00 from 1 reviews
Purple Prairie Clover Seeds 3.0

Review By Mike

Clarification required

Conflicting instructions on site vs packaging.

Add your review of this product
Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $4.80 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $7.20 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $19.20 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $72.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

Meriwether Lewis described this prairie plant in his diary entry of September 2nd 1804, saying that “the Indians use it as an application to fresh wounds.” He went on to collect several more specimens and described them fully in his notes, since he had no previous knowledge of the plant. Purple Prairie Clover produces protein-rich seed that is a source of food for many birds as well as deer, antelope, livestock, and small animals of all kinds. Native Americans also valued this versatile plant, often brewing the leaves for tea or eating the roots as a delicacy. The Pawnees dried the stems and tied them together for brooms, leading to the nickname “broom weed.” The genus name Dalea honors Samuel Dale (1659-1739), an English botanist, physician, and historian.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow the seed in early spring, planting it ¼” deep in firmly compacted soil. Keep the soil consistently moist until germination, which usually occurs within 10-12 days. Thin or transplant seedlings to 15-18” apart. To start the seed indoors, plant it ¼” deep in a flat; keep the soil at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F and consistently moist until germination. Transplant seedlings after the last spring frost or when they reach a height of several inches. This plant adapts well to sand, clay, and gravel.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established; the plant develops rather slowly because of the long tap root, which takes much of the plant’s energy in its first year. Mature plants can tolerate drought because of their long taproot, but appreciate watering in dry periods. For the healthiest growth, control surrounding weeds. This plant does not spread aggressively, and attracts bees.

Harvesting: This unusual flower makes a striking addition to flower arrangements. Cut the stems long and place them in water immediately, stripping the leaves that will fall below the water level.

Seed Saving: After the green spike finishes blooming, it will turn brown and dry. Since birds and rodents love eating this seed, it should be harvested promptly to avoid loss. Strip the heads from their stalks, holding a container underneath to catch the falling seed. The hulls do not need to be removed, but will slow germination; uncleaned seed will need to be scarified. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Violet Prairie Clover

Latin Name: Dalea purpurea

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 17,500

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 24 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Attracts Butterflies, Cut Flowers

Reviews

3.00
Global Rating: 3.00 from 1 reviews
Purple Prairie Clover Seeds 3.0

Review By Mike

Clarification required

Conflicting instructions on site vs packaging.

Add your review of this product