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Northern Bedstraw Seeds

Galium boreale

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seeds just below the surface and lightly compacting the soil. For spring planting or starting indoors, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days before direct sowing; keep the soil consistently moist and at a temperature of 70 degrees F until germination, which usually occurs within 10-15 days. Thin or transplant the seedlings.

Growing: Keep the soil consistently moist; this plant does not tolerate drought well. This plant adapts well to rocky or sandy soil. The foliage can become scorched in excessive sunlight or heat, and the plant prefers growing in cool climates. Though slow to establish, it will spread by rhizomes and by self-seeding and can become rather weedy if left to itself.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut long stems of flowers that have just opened and place them in water immediately; strip the leaves that will fall below the water. This plant also can be dried for a fragrant addition to potpourri, because of its naturally sweet scent.

Seed Saving: After flowering, this plant will produce pairs of seeds that ripen to brown; cut off the stems or strip off the ripe seeds into a container. Store the cleaned seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Galium boreale

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 70,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 24 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~250 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $6.00 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $12.00 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $35.00 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $100.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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This versatile native wildflower has many historical uses. It belongs to the same genus as the European Madder plant, which is used to make dyes; Native Americans valued this plant for its ability to produce a naturally scarce red dye. Bedstraw is also related to the tropical coffee plant, and the seeds can be used to brew a very acceptable substitute for that beverage. This plant produces a substance called asperuloside, which causes a sweet, hay-like scent when the plant has dried. Because of this, it was used as a stuffing or "bedstraw" for mattresses and pillows in medieval times.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seeds just below the surface and lightly compacting the soil. For spring planting or starting indoors, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days before direct sowing; keep the soil consistently moist and at a temperature of 70 degrees F until germination, which usually occurs within 10-15 days. Thin or transplant the seedlings.

Growing: Keep the soil consistently moist; this plant does not tolerate drought well. This plant adapts well to rocky or sandy soil. The foliage can become scorched in excessive sunlight or heat, and the plant prefers growing in cool climates. Though slow to establish, it will spread by rhizomes and by self-seeding and can become rather weedy if left to itself.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut long stems of flowers that have just opened and place them in water immediately; strip the leaves that will fall below the water. This plant also can be dried for a fragrant addition to potpourri, because of its naturally sweet scent.

Seed Saving: After flowering, this plant will produce pairs of seeds that ripen to brown; cut off the stems or strip off the ripe seeds into a container. Store the cleaned seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Galium boreale

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 70,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 24 Inches

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