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Rough Avens Seeds

Geum laciniatum

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting just below the surface. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days before planting. To start indoors, sow seeds in a flat or individual peat pots, keeping the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination, which usually occurs within 7-14 days. Keep the seedlings moist. When the weather has warmed and the seedlings are well established, transplant outdoors.

Growing: Keep the soil moist, especially in the spring while the plants are becoming established; these plants do not tolerate drought well. They spreads slowly by rhizomes and reseeding, and can become rather weedy in good growing conditions. In cold winters, a layer of mulch may be necessary for protection.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed in the garden.

Seed Saving: The spiny green centers of the flowers will eventually turn dry and brown, attaching to fur or clothing because of their barbs. Cut them when they become completely dry. These seeds are difficult to clean because of their spines and outer coating, but they can be planted as they are with moderately successful results.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Geum laciniatum

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6

US Regions: Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 30,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Height: 24 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~800 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $5.40 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $8.00 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $19.20 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

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The name "Geum" is an ancient Greek genus name that date back to Pliny, a Roman naturalist and philosopher. The species name “laciniatum” comes from a Latin word referring to the shapes of the leaves. The hooked spines on the ripening seed head often cling to fur and clothing, as a method of seed distribution. Because of their natural sweetness, the roots of this and several other related species have formerly been used to brew a cocoa-like beverage referred to as “Indian chocolate.”


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting just below the surface. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days before planting. To start indoors, sow seeds in a flat or individual peat pots, keeping the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination, which usually occurs within 7-14 days. Keep the seedlings moist. When the weather has warmed and the seedlings are well established, transplant outdoors.

Growing: Keep the soil moist, especially in the spring while the plants are becoming established; these plants do not tolerate drought well. They spreads slowly by rhizomes and reseeding, and can become rather weedy in good growing conditions. In cold winters, a layer of mulch may be necessary for protection.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed in the garden.

Seed Saving: The spiny green centers of the flowers will eventually turn dry and brown, attaching to fur or clothing because of their barbs. Cut them when they become completely dry. These seeds are difficult to clean because of their spines and outer coating, but they can be planted as they are with moderately successful results.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Geum laciniatum

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6

US Regions: Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 30,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Height: 24 Inches

Reviews