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Prairie Smoke Seeds

Geum triflorum

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting just below the surface. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days; sow seeds in a flat or individual peat pots, keeping the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination, which usually occurs within 7-14 days. Keep the seedlings moist. When the weather has warmed and the seedlings are well established, transplant outdoors; they can also be overwintered indoors and planted out in their second spring.

Growing: Keep the plants watered, especially during spring growth; once established, they prefer dry soil and tolerate drought well. This plant adapts well to rocky or clay soil. When grown from seed, this plant may not fully bloom until its third or fourth season. Keep weeds under control to prevent crowding, which will stunt growth. This plant spreads slowly by reseeding; mature plants can also be divided in spring or fall for new growth. In cold winters, a layer of mulch may be necessary for protection. This plant makes a good choice for rock gardens or borders, and attracts bees and butterflies as well as resisting deer.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, choose plumes that have not yet begun to loosen from the stem; place them in water immediately. These also dry well, and make striking additions to dried flower arrangements.

Seed Saving: As the distinctive maroon and gray plumes age, they will begin to whiten and come loose from the stem. Gather the plumes as soon as they can easily be removed, since the wind will eventually blow them away.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: 3-Flower Avens, Purple Avens, Torch Flower, Old Man's Beard, Old Man's Whiskers

Latin Name: Geum triflorum

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 30,500

Stratification: Stratify 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

Reviews

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~100 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $8.00 Sold Out
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $24.00 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $70.00 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $200.00 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

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This well-loved native wildflower first appears in the historical records of the Lewis and Clark expedition, collected on Idaho’s Weippe Prairie on June 12, 1806. Its distinctive plumes are designed for seed dispersal, since the seeds attached are carried away on the wind at the end of the season. This plant also has ornamental value because of its fern-like foliage that turns reddish purple in the fall. The species name “trifolium” refers to the flowers, which often occur in clusters of three. Because of their natural sweetness, the roots of this and several other related species have formerly been used to brew a cocoa-like beverage.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting just below the surface. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days; sow seeds in a flat or individual peat pots, keeping the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination, which usually occurs within 7-14 days. Keep the seedlings moist. When the weather has warmed and the seedlings are well established, transplant outdoors; they can also be overwintered indoors and planted out in their second spring.

Growing: Keep the plants watered, especially during spring growth; once established, they prefer dry soil and tolerate drought well. This plant adapts well to rocky or clay soil. When grown from seed, this plant may not fully bloom until its third or fourth season. Keep weeds under control to prevent crowding, which will stunt growth. This plant spreads slowly by reseeding; mature plants can also be divided in spring or fall for new growth. In cold winters, a layer of mulch may be necessary for protection. This plant makes a good choice for rock gardens or borders, and attracts bees and butterflies as well as resisting deer.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, choose plumes that have not yet begun to loosen from the stem; place them in water immediately. These also dry well, and make striking additions to dried flower arrangements.

Seed Saving: As the distinctive maroon and gray plumes age, they will begin to whiten and come loose from the stem. Gather the plumes as soon as they can easily be removed, since the wind will eventually blow them away.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: 3-Flower Avens, Purple Avens, Torch Flower, Old Man's Beard, Old Man's Whiskers

Latin Name: Geum triflorum

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 30,500

Stratification: Stratify 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

Reviews