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Ginseng Seeds

Panax quinquefolia

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: If storing the seed until planting, it should be kept in the refrigerator with consistent moisture and good air flow. Plant the seeds in late fall before the ground freezes, planting them 3/4” deep and 3” apart. Compact the soil and apply a light layer of leaf mulch over the surface. The seed should germinate in the spring. Keep in mind that this seed has erratic germination rates, and may not germinate until its second spring.

Growing: In their first several years of growth, these seedlings will only show a few leaflets as they concentrate on developing their root system. It usually takes 5-8 years for the plant to reach full maturity and begin producing the characteristic red berries. This plant flourishes in moist, well drained woodland soil with leaf mulch. Avoid planting in underbrush and shrubbery, since this can deprive the plants of nutrients and good air circulation; poor air circulation can cause blight. These plants may eventually self-seed.

Harvesting: Plants should be at least five years old before root harvesting is attempted. For easiest harvesting, moisten the soil or harvest after rainfall. Dig several inches from the plant to avoid damaging the root; carefully wash the roots without removing the hairs or scrubbing the surface.

Seed Saving: Gather the red fruits when they have reached full ripeness, usually in early fall. Crush the fruits, and remove the seeds from the pulp. Sow immediately, or keep moist in the refrigerator until planting.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: American Ginseng

Latin Name: Panax quinquefolia

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

US Regions: Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 2,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 12 Weeks, then Warm/Wet for 12 Weeks – Repeat

Germination Ease: Stratify 24 Weeks

Height: 12 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~50 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $6.00 Sold Out
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $16.32 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $47.60 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $136.00 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

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This traditional medicinal herb has been used both by Native Americans and the ancient Chinese for treating various ailments. Herbalists still value it as a remedy for reducing stress and increasing energy. In the United States, the long-lived, slow growing plant is most commonly found in the mountains of in the Southern Appalachian region. Primarily because of over harvesting, wild colonies of this plant have reached near extinction in some areas; many states protect this plant or prohibit harvest of its valuable roots. The genus name “Panax” comes from the Greek words meaning “all-heal,” referring to the plant’s medicinal properties.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: If storing the seed until planting, it should be kept in the refrigerator with consistent moisture and good air flow. Plant the seeds in late fall before the ground freezes, planting them 3/4” deep and 3” apart. Compact the soil and apply a light layer of leaf mulch over the surface. The seed should germinate in the spring. Keep in mind that this seed has erratic germination rates, and may not germinate until its second spring.

Growing: In their first several years of growth, these seedlings will only show a few leaflets as they concentrate on developing their root system. It usually takes 5-8 years for the plant to reach full maturity and begin producing the characteristic red berries. This plant flourishes in moist, well drained woodland soil with leaf mulch. Avoid planting in underbrush and shrubbery, since this can deprive the plants of nutrients and good air circulation; poor air circulation can cause blight. These plants may eventually self-seed.

Harvesting: Plants should be at least five years old before root harvesting is attempted. For easiest harvesting, moisten the soil or harvest after rainfall. Dig several inches from the plant to avoid damaging the root; carefully wash the roots without removing the hairs or scrubbing the surface.

Seed Saving: Gather the red fruits when they have reached full ripeness, usually in early fall. Crush the fruits, and remove the seeds from the pulp. Sow immediately, or keep moist in the refrigerator until planting.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: American Ginseng

Latin Name: Panax quinquefolia

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

US Regions: Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 2,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 12 Weeks, then Warm/Wet for 12 Weeks – Repeat

Germination Ease: Stratify 24 Weeks

Height: 12 Inches

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