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Swamp Mallow Seeds

Hibiscus palustris

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seeds ¼” deep. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 60 days before direct sowing. To start indoors, sow seeds ¼” deep in a flat or individual peat pots, keeping the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 80-85 degrees F until germination. Keep the seedlings evenly moist. When the weather has warmed and the seedlings are well established, transplant outdoors.

Growing: In their first seasons of development, these young plants need consistent moisture for healthy growth. Mature plants can adapt to some drought or excess moisture. In general, this plant will produce the best results in moist, rich soil and adapts well to marshy or consistently wet soil. Pinch back the growing stems in spring to produce a bushier, more compact plant. Deadhead spent blossoms to prolong blooming. When the plant dies back at the end of the season, cut it down to several inches above the ground. Provide a thick layer of mulch for protection over winter, especially if the ground freezes. In cooler climates the plant tends to be slow to emerge in the spring, often not appearing until early summer. These flowers attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut long stems of flowers that have just opened and place them in water immediately; strip the leaves that will fall below the water.

Seed Saving: After flowering, this plant will produce papery light brown seed pods that contain fuzzy, round brown seeds. Remove the pods and spread them out to dry. Open the papery pods and shake out the seed inside. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Crimsoneyed Rosemallow

Latin Name: Hibiscus palustris

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 3,700

Stratification: Stratify 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Uses: Deer Resistant

Reviews

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~60 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $5.40 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $9.10 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $26.00 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $104.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $390.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Though many of the plants in the Hibiscus genus grow in tropical or semitropical regions, several hardier species such as this one are native to North America. The genus name Hibiscus comes from the Greek word for “mallow,” the name of a common flower. The species name “palustris” means “swampy,” referring to this plant’s preference for marshy or wet soil. In the language of flowers, hibiscus signifies delicate beauty or gentleness.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seeds ¼” deep. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 60 days before direct sowing. To start indoors, sow seeds ¼” deep in a flat or individual peat pots, keeping the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 80-85 degrees F until germination. Keep the seedlings evenly moist. When the weather has warmed and the seedlings are well established, transplant outdoors.

Growing: In their first seasons of development, these young plants need consistent moisture for healthy growth. Mature plants can adapt to some drought or excess moisture. In general, this plant will produce the best results in moist, rich soil and adapts well to marshy or consistently wet soil. Pinch back the growing stems in spring to produce a bushier, more compact plant. Deadhead spent blossoms to prolong blooming. When the plant dies back at the end of the season, cut it down to several inches above the ground. Provide a thick layer of mulch for protection over winter, especially if the ground freezes. In cooler climates the plant tends to be slow to emerge in the spring, often not appearing until early summer. These flowers attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut long stems of flowers that have just opened and place them in water immediately; strip the leaves that will fall below the water.

Seed Saving: After flowering, this plant will produce papery light brown seed pods that contain fuzzy, round brown seeds. Remove the pods and spread them out to dry. Open the papery pods and shake out the seed inside. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Crimsoneyed Rosemallow

Latin Name: Hibiscus palustris

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 3,700

Stratification: Stratify 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Uses: Deer Resistant

Reviews