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Wild Mint Seeds

Mentha arvensis

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring as soon as the ground can be worked. Since this tiny seed needs light to germinate, plant it near the surface of the soil. Keep the soil consistently moist until germination.

Growing: Keep the developing seedlings moist, and thin or space them out if necessary. Mature plants can be invasive; to prevent spreading, either grow as a container plant or remove any young plants that develop. A layer of mulch can also help prevent new growth. This plant is very attractive to bees and butterflies. Keep in mind that this plant crosses easily with other varieties of mint.

Harvesting: For fresh mint leaves, choose leaves in the morning before the dew has dried. Leaf quality is best before the plant has flowered; to lengthen the harvesting period, remove buds as they begin to develop.

Seed Saving: Harvest the seed heads as soon as they grow dry and brown; spread them out to finish drying out of sunlight, then thresh them to remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Common Mint, Corn Mint, Field Mint, Virginia Bunchflower

Latin Name: Mentha arvensis

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 308,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 24 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Aromatic, Deer Resistant

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~1750 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $5.40 Sold Out
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $9.12 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $26.60 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $76.00 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

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This variety of mint grows wild in many temperate countries around the world, and is sometimes considered a weed because of its profuse growth. It has numerous culinary and medicinal uses, since its leaves contain a valuable essential oil. Mint received its name from the Greek legend of "Minthe," a river nymph who was turned into a lowly plant to be trodden underfoot; the stimulating, sweet smell perpetuated her memory.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring as soon as the ground can be worked. Since this tiny seed needs light to germinate, plant it near the surface of the soil. Keep the soil consistently moist until germination.

Growing: Keep the developing seedlings moist, and thin or space them out if necessary. Mature plants can be invasive; to prevent spreading, either grow as a container plant or remove any young plants that develop. A layer of mulch can also help prevent new growth. This plant is very attractive to bees and butterflies. Keep in mind that this plant crosses easily with other varieties of mint.

Harvesting: For fresh mint leaves, choose leaves in the morning before the dew has dried. Leaf quality is best before the plant has flowered; to lengthen the harvesting period, remove buds as they begin to develop.

Seed Saving: Harvest the seed heads as soon as they grow dry and brown; spread them out to finish drying out of sunlight, then thresh them to remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Common Mint, Corn Mint, Field Mint, Virginia Bunchflower

Latin Name: Mentha arvensis

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 308,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 24 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Aromatic, Deer Resistant

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