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Glade Mallow Seeds

Napaea dioica

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seed below the surface of the soil since this seed needs darkness to germinate. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. This seed can also be started indoors 6-8 weeks before planting in the spring.

Growing: Keep both young and mature plants moist, since this plant appreciates constantly moist but well-draining soil. The leaves quickly wilt if the soil becomes dry. Since the stems of this plant can be damaged by wind, plant in a somewhat protected location.

Harvesting: For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately.

Seed Saving: After blooming, the female flowers of this plant will produce small rounded clusters that contain 6-8 seeds each. Collect them as soon as the seeds have begun to turn brown, since the clusters will eventually loosen and drop their seed. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Napaea dioica

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 4, 5, 6

US Regions: Midwest, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 4,900

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Height: 80 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~500 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $8.00 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $32.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $120.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Carl Linnaeus included this plant family in his famed Species Plantarum, deriving the genus name "Napaea" from the Greek word for a wooded valley or glade. Since this plant usually grows in wetlands, the genus name most likely refers to its first discovery in a mountain valley in Augusta County, Virginia. Several states have listed this plant among those of special ecological concern, since it has been decreasing in the wild.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seed below the surface of the soil since this seed needs darkness to germinate. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. This seed can also be started indoors 6-8 weeks before planting in the spring.

Growing: Keep both young and mature plants moist, since this plant appreciates constantly moist but well-draining soil. The leaves quickly wilt if the soil becomes dry. Since the stems of this plant can be damaged by wind, plant in a somewhat protected location.

Harvesting: For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately.

Seed Saving: After blooming, the female flowers of this plant will produce small rounded clusters that contain 6-8 seeds each. Collect them as soon as the seeds have begun to turn brown, since the clusters will eventually loosen and drop their seed. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Napaea dioica

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 4, 5, 6

US Regions: Midwest, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 4,900

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Height: 80 Inches

Reviews