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American Lotus Seeds

Nelumbo lutea

5.00 (1 reviews)
  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Before planting, these seeds need to be scarified to permeate the hard seed coat and allow sprouting. With a metal file, remove the seed coat from the side of the seed until the pale yellow of the seed's center is barely exposed. Soak the seeds in water until they sprout, changing the water every day to prevent disease. Sprouting usually takes 2-4 weeks. Plant the sprouts in small peat pots just covered in water, keeping in mind that the emerging stem is actually a leaf and not the taproot. Increase the water's depth as the plants grow. Transplant outdoors carefully, since this plant resents having its roots disturbed.

Growing: This plant grows well in either muddy, shallow water or in water as deep as six feet. Though rooted in the mud, its leaves and flowers float on the surface of the water. To prevent spreading or for easy relocating, this plant can be grown in large containers immersed in water at least 2 feet deep. Though a lovely and beneficial plant, it tends to spread in good growing conditions and is on the invasive plant lists of CT and RI.

Harvesting: These short-lived blossoms do not make good cut flowers, and are best enjoyed in the wild. The unique dried seed receptacles, however, are extremely popular in dried flower arrangements.

Seed Saving: After blooming, large seeds will form in the unique rounded seed receptacles. Collect the seeds as soon as they turn brown, and store them in the refrigerator until planting.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Yellow Lotus, Water-Chinquapin

Latin Name: Nelumbo lutea

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

US Regions: California, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 30

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 60 Inches

5.00
Global Rating: 5.00 from 1 reviews
American Lotus Seeds 5.0

Review By A small problem

The Picture is the wrong one!

Hi guys I love how you've designed the website to incorporate USDA maps about distribution. However your Nelumbo picture do NOT match the Latin name and since both waterlilies and lotus are found in the US it's hard to tell which one the listing means. Best wishes.

Add your review of this product
Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~3 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $8.00 -+
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DESCRIPTION

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Classified as an emergent aquatic plant, this native lotus roots itself in the mud while its leaves and flowers float on the surface of the water. Both the tubers at the roots and the leaves once provided a valued food source for Native American tribes. The genus name comes from the Sinhalese word for "lotus," while the species name comes from the Latin word for "yellow." The seeds of this plant repel water very well and remain viable for at least 200 years.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Before planting, these seeds need to be scarified to permeate the hard seed coat and allow sprouting. With a metal file, remove the seed coat from the side of the seed until the pale yellow of the seed's center is barely exposed. Soak the seeds in water until they sprout, changing the water every day to prevent disease. Sprouting usually takes 2-4 weeks. Plant the sprouts in small peat pots just covered in water, keeping in mind that the emerging stem is actually a leaf and not the taproot. Increase the water's depth as the plants grow. Transplant outdoors carefully, since this plant resents having its roots disturbed.

Growing: This plant grows well in either muddy, shallow water or in water as deep as six feet. Though rooted in the mud, its leaves and flowers float on the surface of the water. To prevent spreading or for easy relocating, this plant can be grown in large containers immersed in water at least 2 feet deep. Though a lovely and beneficial plant, it tends to spread in good growing conditions and is on the invasive plant lists of CT and RI.

Harvesting: These short-lived blossoms do not make good cut flowers, and are best enjoyed in the wild. The unique dried seed receptacles, however, are extremely popular in dried flower arrangements.

Seed Saving: After blooming, large seeds will form in the unique rounded seed receptacles. Collect the seeds as soon as they turn brown, and store them in the refrigerator until planting.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Yellow Lotus, Water-Chinquapin

Latin Name: Nelumbo lutea

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

US Regions: California, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 30

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 60 Inches

Reviews

5.00
Global Rating: 5.00 from 1 reviews
American Lotus Seeds 5.0

Review By A small problem

The Picture is the wrong one!

Hi guys I love how you've designed the website to incorporate USDA maps about distribution. However your Nelumbo picture do NOT match the Latin name and since both waterlilies and lotus are found in the US it's hard to tell which one the listing means. Best wishes.

Add your review of this product