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Love In A Mist Seeds

Nigella damascena

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring after the last chance of frost. Plant the seeds just below the surface of the soil, and keep the soil consistently moist until germination. For continuous blooming, plant a new crop every 4 weeks. Keep in mind that this plant does not transplant well.

Growing: Keep the plants watered, since they do not appreciate dry soil and soon wither in drought. Keep in mind that this plant does not do well in excessive heat, and may decline in the heat of summer. Deadheading will produce additional blooms, but also delays the growth of the ornamental seed pods. This annual may reseed for a new crop next year.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, choose stalks that have reached full bloom. Strip away the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately. For dried flower arrangements, allow the seed pods to develop and begin to dry on the stem; hang the stalks upside-down in a warm, dry place until they have completely dried. For best results, leave space around each stalk for good air movement.

Seed Saving: Allow the large, rounded seed pods to develop and brown on the stem. As soon as the pods have dried, break them off and open them to remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Devil-in-the-bush, Devil-in-a-cage

Latin Name: Nigella damascena

Species Origin: Introduced US Wildflower

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 12,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 20 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $4.80 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $7.20 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $21.60 -+
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DESCRIPTION

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A time-honored favorite in English cottage gardens, this flower originally comes from the Mediterranean region. Many plants in this family have herb-like qualities, though this plant is enjoyed primarily in both fresh and dried flower arrangements. The genus name Nigella comes from the Latin word "niger," meaning "black" and referring to the color of the seed. The species name "damascena" refers to the plant's history in Damascus, Syria.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring after the last chance of frost. Plant the seeds just below the surface of the soil, and keep the soil consistently moist until germination. For continuous blooming, plant a new crop every 4 weeks. Keep in mind that this plant does not transplant well.

Growing: Keep the plants watered, since they do not appreciate dry soil and soon wither in drought. Keep in mind that this plant does not do well in excessive heat, and may decline in the heat of summer. Deadheading will produce additional blooms, but also delays the growth of the ornamental seed pods. This annual may reseed for a new crop next year.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, choose stalks that have reached full bloom. Strip away the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately. For dried flower arrangements, allow the seed pods to develop and begin to dry on the stem; hang the stalks upside-down in a warm, dry place until they have completely dried. For best results, leave space around each stalk for good air movement.

Seed Saving: Allow the large, rounded seed pods to develop and brown on the stem. As soon as the pods have dried, break them off and open them to remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Devil-in-the-bush, Devil-in-a-cage

Latin Name: Nigella damascena

Species Origin: Introduced US Wildflower

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 12,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 20 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers

Reviews