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Organic Rapinni Spring Raab Broccoli Seeds

Brassica oleracea

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: This plant grows best in cool weather, so starting the seeds indoors 5-6 weeks before the last expected frost will ensure a faster crop. Shortly after the last frost, prepare the ground with organic matter or fertilizer; when the seedlings reach about 6" tall, plant them 1-2' apart in rows 2-3' apart. For direct sowing seeds, plant them 1/2" deep in full sun and rich soil, after the last expected spring frost. Keep the soil moist. For companion planting benefits, plant broccoli with herbs, potatoes, or onions; avoid planting it with tomatoes or pole beans.

Growing: Keep the young plants watered and remove weeds carefully. Mulch helps discourage weeds and regulate soil temperature, and several applications of fertilizer or compost will also be needed.

Harvesting: The tender florets should be harvested as soon as they reach a diameter of 1" and before the buds open. Continue harvesting as long as the florets remain tender.

Seed Saving: Allowing broccoli to produce seed will take an entire growing season, and may require digging up the plants for the winter or mulching them well. Broccoli will cross pollinate with other members of the cabbage family such as cauliflower, and isolation of at least 1/4 a mile is recommended to prevent cross breeding. Once the flowers have bloomed and produced seed pods, let them dry and carefully remove them from the plant. Separate the seeds from the pods. Store in a dry, cool place for up to five years.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Brassica oleracea

Type: Open Pollinated, Cool Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 9,200

Planting Method: From Transplant

Height: 24 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~100 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $8.00 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $22.40 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $84.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Though it resembles broccoli, this vegetable actually has a closer connection to the turnip family. Its small broccoli-like florets never grow larger than a few inches, and have a rich, slightly peppery flavor. Italian cuisine makes particular use of rapini, often preparing it sauteed in olive oil and garlic. Rapini is also known and loved in China and Hong Kong, rating as one of the most popular vegetables in those countries.
Though it resembles broccoli, this vegetable actually has a closer connection to the turnip family. Its small broccoli-like florets never grow larger than a few inches, and have a rich, slightly peppery flavor. Italian cuisine makes particular use of rapini, often preparing it sauteed in olive oil and garlic. Rapini is also known and loved in China and Hong Kong, rating as one of the most popular vegetables in those countries.

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: This plant grows best in cool weather, so starting the seeds indoors 5-6 weeks before the last expected frost will ensure a faster crop. Shortly after the last frost, prepare the ground with organic matter or fertilizer; when the seedlings reach about 6" tall, plant them 1-2' apart in rows 2-3' apart. For direct sowing seeds, plant them 1/2" deep in full sun and rich soil, after the last expected spring frost. Keep the soil moist. For companion planting benefits, plant broccoli with herbs, potatoes, or onions; avoid planting it with tomatoes or pole beans.

Growing: Keep the young plants watered and remove weeds carefully. Mulch helps discourage weeds and regulate soil temperature, and several applications of fertilizer or compost will also be needed.

Harvesting: The tender florets should be harvested as soon as they reach a diameter of 1" and before the buds open. Continue harvesting as long as the florets remain tender.

Seed Saving: Allowing broccoli to produce seed will take an entire growing season, and may require digging up the plants for the winter or mulching them well. Broccoli will cross pollinate with other members of the cabbage family such as cauliflower, and isolation of at least 1/4 a mile is recommended to prevent cross breeding. Once the flowers have bloomed and produced seed pods, let them dry and carefully remove them from the plant. Separate the seeds from the pods. Store in a dry, cool place for up to five years.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Brassica oleracea

Type: Open Pollinated, Cool Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 9,200

Planting Method: From Transplant

Height: 24 Inches

Reviews