Free Shipping on $50+ orders!

Basket

Organic Rio Grande Hot Pepper Seeds

Capsicum annuum

5.00 (1 reviews)
  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Start pepper seeds indoors in peat pots about 8 weeks before the last expected spring frost. Sow them 1/4" deep and keep the soil at 80-85 degrees F until germination; provide sunlight or a grow light for 12-16 hours a day. When the outdoor temperature reaches 60-65 degrees F during the day and no less than 50 degrees F at night, transplant the seedlings. Exposing the plants to the weather for several hours a day before transplanting may help prevent shock.

Growing: Keep the soil evenly moist and weeds under control; mulching the plants may help with this. If excess heat and sun cause the plants to wilt, provide shade.

Harvesting: Harvesting peppers is basically a matter of personal preference. Generally, the longer the peppers mature on the vine, the hotter they will taste. Mature peppers, however, signal the plant to stop producing; if the peppers are picked when still at the green stage, the plant will go on producing. Always use a knife or scissors to remove peppers to prevent damage to the fragile stems.

Seed Saving: Keep in mind that peppers will cross pollinate with other varietes of pepper, so isolation or caging may be necessary to preserve genetic purity. Allow the pepper to fully mature, than cut it open and remove the seeds. Spread out the seeds to dry for about two weeks. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place for up to two years.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Capsicum annuum

Type: Open Pollinated, Hot Pepper, Warm Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 3,750

Planting Method: From Transplant

Sunlight: Full Sun

Height: 24 Inches

Color: Red, Green

Organic Rio Grande Hot Pepper Seeds 5.0
Review By Mike Barnard

Did Not Sprout

I ordered the same seeds from am etsy vendor because everwilde was out at the time. About a week later I noticed everwilde had gotten theirs back in, so I ordered a pack from them also. Both vendors were stingy with the amount of seeds. I think their were around 18 to 24 seeds in the pack from both vendors. Only 1 seed sprouted from everwilde. About 90% of the seeds I got from the etsy vendor sprouted, so I know it wasn't anything I did. I ordered 3 more packs from everwilde, thinking I may have gotten a bad batch. None of those came up at all. I had a lot of confidence in everwilde, because I have always gotten good results and generous amounts of seeds in the past. Now I am hesitant to order from them. I really hope this was just a bad year for these seeds. I also hope the reason for the stingy amount of seeds had something to do with seed shortages.

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~25 Seeds) $3.96 Notify Me
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $9.60 Notify Me
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $18.40 Notify Me
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $73.60 Notify Me
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $276.00 Notify Me
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

This particular variety of hot pepper was developed by the New Mexico State University and is slightly milder than a Jalapeno. The peppers grow about 2" long and turn red when they are mature. These peppers have about 3,500 Scoville Heat Units.
Records show that hot peppers were discovered by Christopher Columbus in his travels and taken back to Europe, where they immediately established themselves in European cuisine. Originally, cooks began using hot peppers to flavor their food because of the expense of the spice black pepper; soon, however, hot peppers became extremely popular and even preferred. This particular variety of hot pepper was developed by the New Mexico State University, and is described as slightly milder than a jalapeno.

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Start pepper seeds indoors in peat pots about 8 weeks before the last expected spring frost. Sow them 1/4" deep and keep the soil at 80-85 degrees F until germination; provide sunlight or a grow light for 12-16 hours a day. When the outdoor temperature reaches 60-65 degrees F during the day and no less than 50 degrees F at night, transplant the seedlings. Exposing the plants to the weather for several hours a day before transplanting may help prevent shock.

Growing: Keep the soil evenly moist and weeds under control; mulching the plants may help with this. If excess heat and sun cause the plants to wilt, provide shade.

Harvesting: Harvesting peppers is basically a matter of personal preference. Generally, the longer the peppers mature on the vine, the hotter they will taste. Mature peppers, however, signal the plant to stop producing; if the peppers are picked when still at the green stage, the plant will go on producing. Always use a knife or scissors to remove peppers to prevent damage to the fragile stems.

Seed Saving: Keep in mind that peppers will cross pollinate with other varietes of pepper, so isolation or caging may be necessary to preserve genetic purity. Allow the pepper to fully mature, than cut it open and remove the seeds. Spread out the seeds to dry for about two weeks. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place for up to two years.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Capsicum annuum

Type: Open Pollinated, Hot Pepper, Warm Season

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Seeds per Ounce: 3,750

Planting Method: From Transplant

Sunlight: Full Sun

Height: 24 Inches

Color: Red, Green

Reviews

5.00
Global Rating: 5.00 from 1 reviews
5.0

Review By Mike Barnard

Did Not Sprout

I ordered the same seeds from am etsy vendor because everwilde was out at the time. About a week later I noticed everwilde had gotten theirs back in, so I ordered a pack from them also. Both vendors were stingy with the amount of seeds. I think their were around 18 to 24 seeds in the pack from both vendors. Only 1 seed sprouted from everwilde. About 90% of the seeds I got from the etsy vendor sprouted, so I know it wasn't anything I did. I ordered 3 more packs from everwilde, thinking I may have gotten a bad batch. None of those came up at all. I had a lot of confidence in everwilde, because I have always gotten good results and generous amounts of seeds in the past. Now I am hesitant to order from them. I really hope this was just a bad year for these seeds. I also hope the reason for the stingy amount of seeds had something to do with seed shortages.