Free Shipping on $50+ orders!

Basket

Oriental Poppy Seeds

Papaver orientale

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring, pressing the seed into the surface of the soil. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which should occur within 14-20 days. Do not attempt to move seedlings, since they resent having their roots disturbed. For an early start, start the seed indoors in peat pots 6-8 weeks before the last frost and plant outdoors.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well, though they appreciate watering in dry weather. Do not attempt to move the plants, since they do not transplant well. This plant does not grow well in high heat or humidity, and also resents excessively wet soil in the winter. Deadheading is not necessary, since this plant will not rebloom; if seeds are not required, cut the plant back after blooming has finished. This plant often self-sows, and is highly attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds.

Harvesting: For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately. For especially long-lasting blooms, sear the freshly cut ends with boiling water or a flame.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, small pods will form that eventually open at the top to reveal the ripe seeds. Gather the seeds as soon as the pods have opened; watch them carefully to prevent loss, since the seeds can easily be blown away by the wind. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place; keep in mind that they tend to lose their viability quickly, and are best planted within a year of harvest.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Papaver orientale

Species Origin: Introduced US Flower

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 110,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Deer Resistant

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $4.80 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $7.20 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $12.80 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $51.20 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $192.00 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

In the early 1700s, French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort and several colleagues made a research expedition to the many Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries. His travels eventually took him to Turkey, where he traveled through the mountains with a large caravan. His botanical notes show that he found and collected seeds from this plant during this part of the journey. The genus name “Papaver” comes from the Latin word for “milk,” referring to the white sap in the stem. The species name “orientale” refers to the plant’s place of origin.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring, pressing the seed into the surface of the soil. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which should occur within 14-20 days. Do not attempt to move seedlings, since they resent having their roots disturbed. For an early start, start the seed indoors in peat pots 6-8 weeks before the last frost and plant outdoors.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well, though they appreciate watering in dry weather. Do not attempt to move the plants, since they do not transplant well. This plant does not grow well in high heat or humidity, and also resents excessively wet soil in the winter. Deadheading is not necessary, since this plant will not rebloom; if seeds are not required, cut the plant back after blooming has finished. This plant often self-sows, and is highly attractive to bees, butterflies, and birds.

Harvesting: For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately. For especially long-lasting blooms, sear the freshly cut ends with boiling water or a flame.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, small pods will form that eventually open at the top to reveal the ripe seeds. Gather the seeds as soon as the pods have opened; watch them carefully to prevent loss, since the seeds can easily be blown away by the wind. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place; keep in mind that they tend to lose their viability quickly, and are best planted within a year of harvest.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Papaver orientale

Species Origin: Introduced US Flower

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 110,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Deer Resistant

Reviews