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Purple Locoweed Seeds

Oxytropis lambertii

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring, planting the seed just below the surface of the soil. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. Since these plants do not like having their roots disturbed, do not attempt to move the seedlings. For an early start, start the seed in peat pots 6-8 weeks before the last frost and carefully plant outdoors.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well and grow well in dry or sandy soil, though they also flourish in average soil. Too much moisture, especially over the winter, will harm this plant. Keep in mind that this plant resents having its roots disturbed, and is best left alone once established. In good growing conditions, it may spread by rhizomes to form a colony. This plant is highly attractive to monarch butterflies as well as other butterflies, hummingbirds, and song birds. Because of its potential toxicity, do not establish this plant in pastures or other areas in close proximity to grazing animals.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, choose stalks that have reached full bloom. Strip away the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately.

Seed Saving: After flowering, small pods will develop. Eventually the pods will turn brown, split open at the side, and drop their seed. Collect the pods as soon as they begin to turn brown, making sure the seed inside has ripened to a brown color. After the pods have dried completely, remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dark place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Lambert's Crazyweed

Latin Name: Oxytropis lambertii

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas

Seeds per Ounce: 12,500

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 10 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~60 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $6.00 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $11.52 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $33.60 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $96.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Locoweed earned its name by the unusual effect it has on grazing animals. The foliage causes particular damage to horses, though the poison does not reach a toxic level until 75 percent of the bodyweight has been consumed. In 1814, botanist Fredereck Pursh described the first known specimen of this plant in his influential publication Flora Americae Septentrionalis. Pursh obtained his specimen from the collection of John Bradbury, a Scottish naturalist well known for his explorations of western and midwestern America; Bradbury noted that he found this plant flourishing on the bluffs over the Missouri River. The genus name “Oxytropis” means “sharp keel,” in reference to the sharply pointed petals. The species name “lambertii” honors Aylmer Lambert, a British botanist.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring, planting the seed just below the surface of the soil. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. Since these plants do not like having their roots disturbed, do not attempt to move the seedlings. For an early start, start the seed in peat pots 6-8 weeks before the last frost and carefully plant outdoors.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well and grow well in dry or sandy soil, though they also flourish in average soil. Too much moisture, especially over the winter, will harm this plant. Keep in mind that this plant resents having its roots disturbed, and is best left alone once established. In good growing conditions, it may spread by rhizomes to form a colony. This plant is highly attractive to monarch butterflies as well as other butterflies, hummingbirds, and song birds. Because of its potential toxicity, do not establish this plant in pastures or other areas in close proximity to grazing animals.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, choose stalks that have reached full bloom. Strip away the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately.

Seed Saving: After flowering, small pods will develop. Eventually the pods will turn brown, split open at the side, and drop their seed. Collect the pods as soon as they begin to turn brown, making sure the seed inside has ripened to a brown color. After the pods have dried completely, remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dark place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Lambert's Crazyweed

Latin Name: Oxytropis lambertii

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas

Seeds per Ounce: 12,500

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 10 Inches

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