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Purple Passion Flower Seeds

Passiflora incarnata

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: To help remove natural germination inhibitors on the seeds, soak them in a jar of water for 3-5 days; place the jar in the sunlight. Throw away the seeds that float, since they have most likely lost their viability. Plant the seeds 1/2” deep in a germination flat, and provide heat of at least 80 degrees F. Preserve consistent moisture and humidity by partially covering the flat. Time until germination can be difficult to predict, since it depends on growing conditions. Carefully transplant the seedlings once they can safely be handled and the soil has warmed.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well and prefer slightly dry soils. This vine makes an excellent choice for planting near a trellis, fence, or wall. If the vines begin to grow too thick, cut some of them back at ground level. In good growing conditions, they may spread vigorously; they also grow easily from root or stem cuttings, and can be divided. These blossoms are highly attractive to butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds. In spite of its tropical appearance, this plant can tolerate temperatures down to 0 degrees F.

Harvesting: For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately. Harvest the edible fruits as soon as they give slightly when squeezed; they will still be very green in color. These fruits can be eaten fresh or used to make juice or jelly.

Seed Saving: Allow the fruits to ripen fully on the vine until they reach a yellow color, then remove them from the vine; open them to reveal the seeds in their gelatinous coverings. For best germination rates, plant the seeds directly from the fruit.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Passionflower, Maypop Passionflower, Maypop, Passion Vine, Apricot Vine

Latin Name: Passiflora incarnata

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 850

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Height: 200 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~15 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $4.80 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $7.20 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $16.80 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $48.00 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $192.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $720.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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This flower’s common name comes from symbolism related to the Passion and crucifixion of Christ, though opinions differ as to who first developed this connection. An American species of a tropical flower family, it has a long history of use by Native Americans and early settlers for medicinal and culinary purposes. In his journal from an early expedition to New England, Captain John Smith noted that the natives often cultivated the vines just for their edible fruits. The genus name “Passiflora” means “passion flower.”


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: To help remove natural germination inhibitors on the seeds, soak them in a jar of water for 3-5 days; place the jar in the sunlight. Throw away the seeds that float, since they have most likely lost their viability. Plant the seeds 1/2” deep in a germination flat, and provide heat of at least 80 degrees F. Preserve consistent moisture and humidity by partially covering the flat. Time until germination can be difficult to predict, since it depends on growing conditions. Carefully transplant the seedlings once they can safely be handled and the soil has warmed.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well and prefer slightly dry soils. This vine makes an excellent choice for planting near a trellis, fence, or wall. If the vines begin to grow too thick, cut some of them back at ground level. In good growing conditions, they may spread vigorously; they also grow easily from root or stem cuttings, and can be divided. These blossoms are highly attractive to butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds. In spite of its tropical appearance, this plant can tolerate temperatures down to 0 degrees F.

Harvesting: For cut flowers, choose stems with flowers that have just opened. Strip the foliage that will fall below the water level, and place in water immediately. Harvest the edible fruits as soon as they give slightly when squeezed; they will still be very green in color. These fruits can be eaten fresh or used to make juice or jelly.

Seed Saving: Allow the fruits to ripen fully on the vine until they reach a yellow color, then remove them from the vine; open them to reveal the seeds in their gelatinous coverings. For best germination rates, plant the seeds directly from the fruit.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Passionflower, Maypop Passionflower, Maypop, Passion Vine, Apricot Vine

Latin Name: Passiflora incarnata

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 850

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Height: 200 Inches

Reviews