Free Shipping on $50+ orders!

Basket

Sand Phlox Seeds

Phlox bifida

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting just below the surface of the soil. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. This seed can also be started indoors 6-8 weeks before planting in the spring; the best temperature for germination is 65 degrees F.

Growing: Water seedlings until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well because of their taproot, though they benefit from occasional watering in especially dry weather. Deadhead for increased blooming. If seeds are not required, cut the plant back after blooming has finished. This plant often spreads, and is highly attractive to bees and butterflies. This plant makes an excellent ground cover, border plant, or addition to a rock garden; it grows especially well in sandy soil.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, small pods will form that eventually open and release their seeds. Gather the pods as soon as they have begun to turn brown, but before they burst open; watch them carefully to prevent loss, since the seeds can easily be blown away by the wind. Spread the pods out to dry. As soon as they have completely dried, break open the pods and remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Glade Phlox, Cleft Phlox

Latin Name: Phlox bifida

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Midwest, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 12,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 12 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 12 Weeks

Height: 4 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Hummingbirds, Aromatic, Deer Resistant

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~30 Seeds) $2.50 Sold Out
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $6.00 Sold Out
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $16.32 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $47.60 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $136.00 Sold Out
Sold out

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

The first botanical records of native phlox first appear in Hortus Elthamensis, botanist Johann Dillenius' published description of a famous experimental garden near London in 1732. This garden, under the care of famed English botanist William Sherard, contained several species of wild phlox from America. From that time on, gardeners seemed to agree with horticulturist Karl Foerster that "a garden without a phlox is a mistake." In the language of flowers, phlox symbolizes either the union of souls or sweet dreams. In Victorian times, a bouquet of phlox often indicated a timid proposal of marriage. The name "phlox" comes from the Greek word for "flame," while the species name "bifida" means "divided into two parts," indicating the unique divided petals.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting just below the surface of the soil. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. This seed can also be started indoors 6-8 weeks before planting in the spring; the best temperature for germination is 65 degrees F.

Growing: Water seedlings until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought well because of their taproot, though they benefit from occasional watering in especially dry weather. Deadhead for increased blooming. If seeds are not required, cut the plant back after blooming has finished. This plant often spreads, and is highly attractive to bees and butterflies. This plant makes an excellent ground cover, border plant, or addition to a rock garden; it grows especially well in sandy soil.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, small pods will form that eventually open and release their seeds. Gather the pods as soon as they have begun to turn brown, but before they burst open; watch them carefully to prevent loss, since the seeds can easily be blown away by the wind. Spread the pods out to dry. As soon as they have completely dried, break open the pods and remove the seed. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Glade Phlox, Cleft Phlox

Latin Name: Phlox bifida

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Midwest, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 12,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 12 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 12 Weeks

Height: 4 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Hummingbirds, Aromatic, Deer Resistant

Reviews