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Purple Romagna Artichoke Seeds

Cynara scolymus

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Stratify seeds by putting them in damp sand in the fridge for 2 weeks. Then germinate seeds indoors 8-12 weeks before last frost. Plant them 1/4" deep, in 4" pots, and keep the seedlings at a temperature of 60-70 degrees. Once they grow several leaves, expose them to temperatures lower than 50 degrees F for at 12-20 days; this process, called vernalization, acts as a false "winter" that enhances the growing process. Transplant the seedlings outside two weeks after the last spring frost. Space them 48 apart in rows 64 apart. Direct sowing the seeds outside after last frost also is an option, though it takes the plants longer to mature. Artichokes can also be fall planted, especially in warmer climates, since artichokes thrive in cool weather.

Growing: Take care to keep the young plants moist at all times and surrounded with mulch, compost, or straw. If fungus begins to form because of too much humidity, cut back on the water, and remove the affected leaves at once. Buds should begin to form about 120 days after transplanting, depending upon the climate. To overwinter this plant in warmer climates such as zone 7 and above, cover it thickly with mulch. Prevent excess moisture, as this often causes artichokes to die over winter. In zone 6 and colder, it will be necessary to dig up the plants by the roots, cut the stem to 3", and store them with the roots protected in a cool place until spring. Replant them after the last frost.

Harvesting: If planted soon enough in the spring in warmer climates, artichokes might produce a small crop before fall. Harvest them before the petals of the choke begin to open, and the size reaches about 4". Cut the heads with about 3" of the stem attached. Use immediately for the freshest flavor, or keep refrigerated for up to five days.

Seed Saving: To save the seed, allow the chokes to fully develop and form flowers. Either collect seed heads when flowers turn brown, or allow seed heads to dry on plants. When heads are dry, break them open and collect the seeds. Clean and dry the seeds before storage in a cool dry conditions.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Cynara scolymus

Species Origin: Heirloom from 1835

Type: Open Pollinated, Heirloom, Cool Season

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 500

Planting Method: From Transplant

Stratification: Stratify 2 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 2 Weeks

Reviews

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~50 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $9.60 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $38.40 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $144.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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A favorite of chefs, this Italian artichoke grows large hearted heads that vary in color from green to purple, and are valued for their tenderness and beautiful appearance. The plants grow up to 6 feet tall with edible flower buds (chokes) that are 3 or 4 inches. Can be harvested in second season.
According to historians, this member of the thistle family originated in the Mediterranean region and was especially popular in Sicilian and North African cuisine. Eventually the artichoke migrated to Italy, and when the famous Italian Catherine de Medici moved to France in 1533 to be the queen of Henry II, she took her passion for artichokes with her. Her appetite for this vegetable scandalized the people of her day, as the artichoke was considered an aphrodisiac and only eaten by men. In time, artichokes became a culinary delight only afforded by the elite. The French brought this vegetable to Louisiana, while the Spanish introduced it to California. California still produces nearly all of the United States' supply of artichokes, with Castroville, CA being named as the Artichoke Capital of the World

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Stratify seeds by putting them in damp sand in the fridge for 2 weeks. Then germinate seeds indoors 8-12 weeks before last frost. Plant them 1/4" deep, in 4" pots, and keep the seedlings at a temperature of 60-70 degrees. Once they grow several leaves, expose them to temperatures lower than 50 degrees F for at 12-20 days; this process, called vernalization, acts as a false "winter" that enhances the growing process. Transplant the seedlings outside two weeks after the last spring frost. Space them 48 apart in rows 64 apart. Direct sowing the seeds outside after last frost also is an option, though it takes the plants longer to mature. Artichokes can also be fall planted, especially in warmer climates, since artichokes thrive in cool weather.

Growing: Take care to keep the young plants moist at all times and surrounded with mulch, compost, or straw. If fungus begins to form because of too much humidity, cut back on the water, and remove the affected leaves at once. Buds should begin to form about 120 days after transplanting, depending upon the climate. To overwinter this plant in warmer climates such as zone 7 and above, cover it thickly with mulch. Prevent excess moisture, as this often causes artichokes to die over winter. In zone 6 and colder, it will be necessary to dig up the plants by the roots, cut the stem to 3", and store them with the roots protected in a cool place until spring. Replant them after the last frost.

Harvesting: If planted soon enough in the spring in warmer climates, artichokes might produce a small crop before fall. Harvest them before the petals of the choke begin to open, and the size reaches about 4". Cut the heads with about 3" of the stem attached. Use immediately for the freshest flavor, or keep refrigerated for up to five days.

Seed Saving: To save the seed, allow the chokes to fully develop and form flowers. Either collect seed heads when flowers turn brown, or allow seed heads to dry on plants. When heads are dry, break them open and collect the seeds. Clean and dry the seeds before storage in a cool dry conditions.

FAST FACTS

Latin Name: Cynara scolymus

Species Origin: Heirloom from 1835

Type: Open Pollinated, Heirloom, Cool Season

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 500

Planting Method: From Transplant

Stratification: Stratify 2 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 2 Weeks

Reviews