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Mountain Mint Seeds

Pycnanthemum virginianum

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring as soon as the soil has warmed, pressing into the surface of the soil surface since this plant needs light to germinate. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. If starting the seed indoors, keep in mind that the best temperature for germination is 70 degrees F. Keep seedlings lightly moist, and transplant them as soon as they have developed several leaves.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established, and control weeds. Mature plants tolerate drought well and flourish in fairly dry soil, though they will benefit from occasional watering in dry weather. This plant also grows well in rocky or clay soil. It can spread vigorously by rhizomes once established, though it does not usually reseed. This plant is extremely attractive to bees, and is a valuable nectar plant; it also grows well in containers.

Harvesting: This plant can be harvested for both fresh and dried use. Choose stems that are just beginning to bloom, cutting them in the morning before the dew has dried.

Seed Saving: When the flower spikes begin to dry and turn color, shake the entire plant’s seed heads over a container to remove the seed. To collect the most seed, repeat the process daily until all the seed has matured. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Virginia Mountainmint, Wild Basil, Prairie Hyssop

Latin Name: Pycnanthemum virginianum

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 276,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Attracts Butterflies, Aromatic

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $5.40 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $8.00 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $21.00 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $60.00 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $240.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $900.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Though not from the true mint family, this native American herb provides a very respectable substitute and has a long history of culinary use. The first botanical records of this plant come from French botanist Andre Michaux’s notes from the late 18th century, as a result of his expedition through the frontier of Pennsylvania. The formidable genus name “Pycnanthemum” comes from Latin words meaning “many clustered flowers,” while the species name “virginianum” means “of Virginia.”


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring as soon as the soil has warmed, pressing into the surface of the soil surface since this plant needs light to germinate. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination. If starting the seed indoors, keep in mind that the best temperature for germination is 70 degrees F. Keep seedlings lightly moist, and transplant them as soon as they have developed several leaves.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established, and control weeds. Mature plants tolerate drought well and flourish in fairly dry soil, though they will benefit from occasional watering in dry weather. This plant also grows well in rocky or clay soil. It can spread vigorously by rhizomes once established, though it does not usually reseed. This plant is extremely attractive to bees, and is a valuable nectar plant; it also grows well in containers.

Harvesting: This plant can be harvested for both fresh and dried use. Choose stems that are just beginning to bloom, cutting them in the morning before the dew has dried.

Seed Saving: When the flower spikes begin to dry and turn color, shake the entire plant’s seed heads over a container to remove the seed. To collect the most seed, repeat the process daily until all the seed has matured. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Virginia Mountainmint, Wild Basil, Prairie Hyssop

Latin Name: Pycnanthemum virginianum

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 276,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Attracts Butterflies, Aromatic

Reviews