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Prairie Wild Rose Seeds

Rosa arkansana

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: To soften the hard coating on these seeds, rub them lightly with sandpaper or soak them in 180 degrees F water overnight. Mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 4 months before planting. Sow the seed in early spring, planting 1/2" deep. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which is notoriously slow and irregular. Some seeds may not sprout until the next year.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Most plants do not flower and produce seed until their second or third year of growth. Mature plants tolerate drought very well and prefer dry soils; they grow well in rocky, clay, and sandy soils. These blossoms are highly attractive to bees.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: Near the end of the season, remove the rose hips and split them open to remove the seed. Separate the seeds from the plant material and spread them out to dry. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Dwarf Prairie Rose, Prairie Rose

Latin Name: Rosa arkansana

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Mountain, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 3,300

Stratification: Warm/Wet for 8 Weeks, then Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 12 Weeks

Height: 24 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Aromatic, Cut Flowers

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~60 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $5.40 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $9.10 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $26.00 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $104.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $390.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

In spite of the delicate beauty of its blooms, this native plant is one of the prairie's toughest plants. Botanical records show that even in the terrible midwestern drought of 1934, prairie roses flourished in unprecedented numbers and showed no signs of stress. Because of their extensive root system, they also have excellent resistance to prairie fires. The Latin species name "arkansana" refers to Colorado's Arkansas River, where well known American botanist and professor Thomas C. Porter collected the first known specimen.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: To soften the hard coating on these seeds, rub them lightly with sandpaper or soak them in 180 degrees F water overnight. Mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 4 months before planting. Sow the seed in early spring, planting 1/2" deep. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which is notoriously slow and irregular. Some seeds may not sprout until the next year.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Most plants do not flower and produce seed until their second or third year of growth. Mature plants tolerate drought very well and prefer dry soils; they grow well in rocky, clay, and sandy soils. These blossoms are highly attractive to bees.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: Near the end of the season, remove the rose hips and split them open to remove the seed. Separate the seeds from the plant material and spread them out to dry. Store the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Dwarf Prairie Rose, Prairie Rose

Latin Name: Rosa arkansana

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Mountain, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 3,300

Stratification: Warm/Wet for 8 Weeks, then Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 12 Weeks

Height: 24 Inches

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Aromatic, Cut Flowers

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