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Common Arrowhead Seeds

Sagittaria latifolia

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Plant in late fall, pressing the seed into the surface of the soil since it needs light to germinate. The soil should be continuously wet, even muddy. In order to break its dormancy, this seed needs to experience cold/warm/cold temperatures. This usually means it germinates a year after planting.

Growing: As the plants grow, keep the soil consistently saturated; the water depth can be increased as the plant develops. This plant thrives either at water’s edge or in up to 12” of water. It will eventually spread by rhizomes and by self-seeding.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, the seeds will develop in a rounded seed head that eventually begins to turn brown and dry. Gather the dried seed heads and spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. Rub them lightly to separate the seeds from the plant material. Keep the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Broadleaf Arrowhead, Duck Potato

Latin Name: Sagittaria latifolia

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 58,900

Stratification: Stratify 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Hummingbirds

Reviews

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~1500 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $5.40 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $8.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $24.00 Sold Out
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $96.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $360.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Native to swamps and marshy areas, this plant has a long history of use by Native American tribes because of the potato-like tubers that form at its roots. The common name “duck potato” refers to the many wild birds that forage both from the seeds and the tubers. Famed explorers Lewis and Clark first discovered this plant at Oregon’s Willamette River, noting that it was a valued source of food. The genus name “sagittaria” means “arrow-shaped” in reference to the leaves, while the species name “latifolia” means “wide-leaved.”


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Plant in late fall, pressing the seed into the surface of the soil since it needs light to germinate. The soil should be continuously wet, even muddy. In order to break its dormancy, this seed needs to experience cold/warm/cold temperatures. This usually means it germinates a year after planting.

Growing: As the plants grow, keep the soil consistently saturated; the water depth can be increased as the plant develops. This plant thrives either at water’s edge or in up to 12” of water. It will eventually spread by rhizomes and by self-seeding.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, the seeds will develop in a rounded seed head that eventually begins to turn brown and dry. Gather the dried seed heads and spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. Rub them lightly to separate the seeds from the plant material. Keep the seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Broadleaf Arrowhead, Duck Potato

Latin Name: Sagittaria latifolia

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 58,900

Stratification: Stratify 8 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Uses: Attracts Pollinators, Attracts Honeybees, Hummingbirds

Reviews