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Creeping Zinnia Seeds

Sanvitalia procumbens

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring as soon as the soil has warmed, pressing into the surface of the soil surface since this plant needs light to germinate. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which usually occurs with 14-21 days. Do not attempt to start the seed indoors, since these plants do not respond well to being transplanted.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established. This plant grows quickly and needs little care. Mature plants tolerate heat and drought well; do not over-water. This plant resists deer, and makes an excellent container plant or ground cover.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flower petals fall from the head, the center cone will begin to develop seed. Remove the seed heads as soon as the stem beneath the cone begins to turn dry and brown. Spread the seed heads out to dry away from direct sunlight, then separate the small seeds from the stems by rubbing them lightly. Store the cleaned seed in a dry, cool place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Mexican Creeping Zinnia

Latin Name: Sanvitalia procumbens

Species Origin: Introduced US Wildflower

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 47,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 8 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $8.00 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $32.00 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $120.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Botanical records show that this attractive plant first came to the United States in 1798 from its native Mexico. It is not a true zinnia, resembling instead the popular black-eyed susan. The genus name “Sanvitalia” honors Frederico Sanvitali, a noted 18th century Italian botanist. The species name “procumbens” means “creeping,” referring to the plant’s growth.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in early spring as soon as the soil has warmed, pressing into the surface of the soil surface since this plant needs light to germinate. Keep the soil lightly moist until germination, which usually occurs with 14-21 days. Do not attempt to start the seed indoors, since these plants do not respond well to being transplanted.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established. This plant grows quickly and needs little care. Mature plants tolerate heat and drought well; do not over-water. This plant resists deer, and makes an excellent container plant or ground cover.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flower petals fall from the head, the center cone will begin to develop seed. Remove the seed heads as soon as the stem beneath the cone begins to turn dry and brown. Spread the seed heads out to dry away from direct sunlight, then separate the small seeds from the stems by rubbing them lightly. Store the cleaned seed in a dry, cool place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Mexican Creeping Zinnia

Latin Name: Sanvitalia procumbens

Species Origin: Introduced US Wildflower

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 47,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 8 Inches

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