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Silver Princess Shasta Daisy Seeds

Chrysanthemum maximum

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in spring after the last chance of frost, sowing on the surface of the soil; press the soil down lightly and keep moderately moist until germination, which should take place within 10-14 days. To start indoors, sow on the surface of a flat 6-8 weeks before the last frost of spring. Keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 70 degrees F until germination. Transplant or thin the seedlings as soon as they reach a height of several inches.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established; mature plants also appreciate occasional watering, but since this plant tolerates drought well too much moisture will cause disease and root rot. To encourage branching and bushy growth, pinch off the growing tips; deadheading helps increase blooming all season long. If blooming decreases midseason, cut the plant back by half for new growth. This plant will self-seed, but does not become weedy. For healthiest growth, mature plants should be divided in the fall or early spring. Cut the plants down to 2” above the ground after the first frost. Good drainage over winter is essential for this plant’s survival. This plant’s low mounding growth habit makes it an excellent choice for the front of a border or for supporting taller plants; it also makes a good container plant. These plants attract butterflies and resist deer.

Harvesting: Daisies make long lasting fresh flowers; cut the stems long and place them in water immediately.

Seed Saving: Late in the season, allow the blossoms to fully mature; when the centers turn brown, cut them off and spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. After about two weeks or when the heads have fully dried, rub them lightly to separate the seed from the husks. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Leucanthemum Superbum

Latin Name: Chrysanthemum maximum

Species Origin: Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 27,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 16 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Deer Resistant

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $8.00 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $21.60 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $81.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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The noted American botanist and horticultural expert Luther Burbank introduced the original Shasta Daisy in 1901, a product of more than 15 years of selection and breeding. He named this stunning little flower after California’s Mt. Shasta, a snow-capped mountain. The Silver Princess Shasta Daisy is valued for its smaller, more compact growth and large flowers. The poet Chaucer was the first to give this family of flowers the name “day’s eye,” because of their habit of opening in the morning and closing at night. A common saying of the era stated, “When you can put your foot on seven daisies, summer is come.” In the language of flowers, daisies symbolize innocence, simplicity, and modesty.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in spring after the last chance of frost, sowing on the surface of the soil; press the soil down lightly and keep moderately moist until germination, which should take place within 10-14 days. To start indoors, sow on the surface of a flat 6-8 weeks before the last frost of spring. Keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 70 degrees F until germination. Transplant or thin the seedlings as soon as they reach a height of several inches.

Growing: Water seedlings regularly until they become established; mature plants also appreciate occasional watering, but since this plant tolerates drought well too much moisture will cause disease and root rot. To encourage branching and bushy growth, pinch off the growing tips; deadheading helps increase blooming all season long. If blooming decreases midseason, cut the plant back by half for new growth. This plant will self-seed, but does not become weedy. For healthiest growth, mature plants should be divided in the fall or early spring. Cut the plants down to 2” above the ground after the first frost. Good drainage over winter is essential for this plant’s survival. This plant’s low mounding growth habit makes it an excellent choice for the front of a border or for supporting taller plants; it also makes a good container plant. These plants attract butterflies and resist deer.

Harvesting: Daisies make long lasting fresh flowers; cut the stems long and place them in water immediately.

Seed Saving: Late in the season, allow the blossoms to fully mature; when the centers turn brown, cut them off and spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. After about two weeks or when the heads have fully dried, rub them lightly to separate the seed from the husks. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Leucanthemum Superbum

Latin Name: Chrysanthemum maximum

Species Origin: Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 27,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 16 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Deer Resistant

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