Free Shipping on $50+ orders!

Basket

Tall White Bachelor Button Cornflower Seeds

Centaurea cyanus

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall or early spring, planting the seeds thinly and ˝” deep. In the spring, keep the soil moist after sowing; germination should occur within 7-10 days. To start indoors, plant three or four seeds ˝” below the surface in individual peat pots. Keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination; thin to the strongest seedlings. Transplant the seedlings before they reach a height of 5”.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought, but prefer adequate moisture and may need occasional watering. Prune off developing tips to force the plant to produce more branches and fuller growth, as well as more flowers. If the stems begin to fall over, provide support. Deadhead spent blossom for the most abundant flowers, keeping in mind that the latest blossoms will need be left in order to produce seed; though an annual, it will reseed easily to produce volunteer plants. This plant attracts butterflies and bees, in addition to providing nutritious seed for birds. Cornflower grows well in containers as well as in the garden.

Harvesting: Cornflowers make excellent cut flowers, and usually have a vase life of 4-5 days. When dried, the flowers retain their color and make a good addition to dried flower arrangements or potpourri. To dry the flowers, choose blossoms that have just begun blooming; pick them as soon as the dew has dried. Bundle the stems and hang them upside down in a well-ventilated, dark place for about 2 weeks.

Seed Saving: After the flower fades, the tiny oblong seeds will form. As soon as the seed can easily be removed, it is mature. Remove the dried seed heads and rub them lightly to separate the seed from the husk. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Bachelor's Button

Latin Name: Centaurea cyanus

Species Origin: Southern Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 6,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 30 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~500 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $4.80 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $6.00 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $15.00 -+
Add to Wishlist

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

These bright blossoms once grew wild in the fields of the United Kingdom and southern Europe, though they have become very rare in recent times because of the changing landscape and new farming techniques. This species was first recorded for botanical records in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus. While the genus name “Centaurea” comes from Greek mythology, the common name of Bachelor’s Button comes from the tradition of young men wearing the flower as a sign of love. They were also called cornflowers because of their abundant growth in farmers’ fields. At one time the blossoms were made into a temporary dye most often used for tinting frosting, sugar, or candies.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall or early spring, planting the seeds thinly and ˝” deep. In the spring, keep the soil moist after sowing; germination should occur within 7-10 days. To start indoors, plant three or four seeds ˝” below the surface in individual peat pots. Keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination; thin to the strongest seedlings. Transplant the seedlings before they reach a height of 5”.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants tolerate drought, but prefer adequate moisture and may need occasional watering. Prune off developing tips to force the plant to produce more branches and fuller growth, as well as more flowers. If the stems begin to fall over, provide support. Deadhead spent blossom for the most abundant flowers, keeping in mind that the latest blossoms will need be left in order to produce seed; though an annual, it will reseed easily to produce volunteer plants. This plant attracts butterflies and bees, in addition to providing nutritious seed for birds. Cornflower grows well in containers as well as in the garden.

Harvesting: Cornflowers make excellent cut flowers, and usually have a vase life of 4-5 days. When dried, the flowers retain their color and make a good addition to dried flower arrangements or potpourri. To dry the flowers, choose blossoms that have just begun blooming; pick them as soon as the dew has dried. Bundle the stems and hang them upside down in a well-ventilated, dark place for about 2 weeks.

Seed Saving: After the flower fades, the tiny oblong seeds will form. As soon as the seed can easily be removed, it is mature. Remove the dried seed heads and rub them lightly to separate the seed from the husk. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Bachelor's Button

Latin Name: Centaurea cyanus

Species Origin: Southern Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 6,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 30 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

Reviews