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River Oats Seeds

Uniola latifolia

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow either in late fall or early spring. Press the seed into the surface of the soil, compacting the soil very firmly. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil saturated until germination.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. This plant prefers moist soil, and does not do well in drought. It adapts well to various soil types such as sand and clay with adequate moisture. Though it grows rather slowly, this plant will spread by self-seeding and can become rather weedy in good growing conditions. Mature plants can be divided. This plant makes an very good choice for erosion control, wetland restoration, and strengthening stream banks. It is also a popular ornamental plant, and the seeds attract small birds.

Seed Saving: At the end of the season, the seed heads will begin to ripen. Strip the mature seed from the stem. Spread the seed out and allow it to dry completely, then store it in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Northern Sea Oats, Spangle Grass, Indian Wood Oats, Broadleaf Uniola, Wild Oats, Inland Sea Oats

Latin Name: Uniola latifolia

Species Origin: US Native Grass or Sedge

Type: Native Grasses, Warm Season

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 7,800

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Height: 36 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~200 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $4.80 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $7.20 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $14.40 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $57.60 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $216.00 -+
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DESCRIPTION

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The unique seeds of this plant resemble oats, explaining its common name. Gardeners appreciate this plant for its ornamental qualities. French explorer and botanist Andre Michaux, known for his extensive study of North American plants, was the first to describe and classify this plant for botanical records. The species name "latifolia" means "broad-leaved."


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow either in late fall or early spring. Press the seed into the surface of the soil, compacting the soil very firmly. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil saturated until germination.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. This plant prefers moist soil, and does not do well in drought. It adapts well to various soil types such as sand and clay with adequate moisture. Though it grows rather slowly, this plant will spread by self-seeding and can become rather weedy in good growing conditions. Mature plants can be divided. This plant makes an very good choice for erosion control, wetland restoration, and strengthening stream banks. It is also a popular ornamental plant, and the seeds attract small birds.

Seed Saving: At the end of the season, the seed heads will begin to ripen. Strip the mature seed from the stem. Spread the seed out and allow it to dry completely, then store it in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Northern Sea Oats, Spangle Grass, Indian Wood Oats, Broadleaf Uniola, Wild Oats, Inland Sea Oats

Latin Name: Uniola latifolia

Species Origin: US Native Grass or Sedge

Type: Native Grasses, Warm Season

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

US Regions: Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 7,800

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Height: 36 Inches

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