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Prairie Violet Seeds

Viola pedatifida

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, pressing the seed into the surface of the soil. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil very lightly moist until germination, which can be slow and irregular.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Control weeds, since this plant does not do well with competition. It grows rather slowly, usually blooming in its second year of growth. Mature plants do fairly well in drought, though they adapt to well-drained moist soil. It also grows well in rocky or sandy soil. This plant attracts bees and butterflies, and readily reseeds itself as well as slowly spreading by rhizomes.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, oval pods will begin to develop. When ripe, each pod will split open into three sections that hold the ripe seeds. Remove the seeds. Since they lose their viability quickly, planting immediately will result in the best germination. If storing is necessary, keep the seed in the refrigerator until planting.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Prairie Bird's Foot Violet, Crowfoot Violet, Larkspur Violet, Purple Prairie Violet

Latin Name: Viola pedatifida

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest

Seeds per Ounce: 18,600

Stratification: Warm/Wet for 4 Weeks, then Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Height: 6 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~300 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/64 Oz Mylar (0.44g) $5.40 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $9.12 Sold Out
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $26.60 Sold Out
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $76.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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The first historical record of this species comes from 1831, in the botanical records of Scottish botanist George Don. The species name, “pedatifida,” comes from the Latin words for “cleft like a foot” and refers to the deeply divided leaves that resemble a bird’s foot. Though it appears very similar to the well known Bird’s Foot Violet, this particular species has slightly smaller flowers.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, pressing the seed into the surface of the soil. For spring planting, mix the seeds with moist sand and store in the refrigerator for 60 days before planting. Keep the soil very lightly moist until germination, which can be slow and irregular.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Control weeds, since this plant does not do well with competition. It grows rather slowly, usually blooming in its second year of growth. Mature plants do fairly well in drought, though they adapt to well-drained moist soil. It also grows well in rocky or sandy soil. This plant attracts bees and butterflies, and readily reseeds itself as well as slowly spreading by rhizomes.

Harvesting: These blossoms do not perform well as cut flowers, and are best enjoyed outdoors.

Seed Saving: After the flowers fade, oval pods will begin to develop. When ripe, each pod will split open into three sections that hold the ripe seeds. Remove the seeds. Since they lose their viability quickly, planting immediately will result in the best germination. If storing is necessary, keep the seed in the refrigerator until planting.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Prairie Bird's Foot Violet, Crowfoot Violet, Larkspur Violet, Purple Prairie Violet

Latin Name: Viola pedatifida

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest

Seeds per Ounce: 18,600

Stratification: Warm/Wet for 4 Weeks, then Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 8 Weeks

Height: 6 Inches

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