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Beach Wormwood Seeds

Artemisia caudata

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow on the surface of the soil in late fall or early spring, and thin or transplant the seedlings to 24-36" apart. To start the seed indoors, sow on the surface of a flat; keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination. Transplant the seedlings as soon as they grow big enough to handle safely.

Growing: These plants thrive in full sun and dry, sandy soil. They do not need watering, since they tolerate drought well. Since this plant is a short-lived perennial, its life can be prolonged by removing the stalks as soon as they begin to flower. These plants easily reseed themselves, and can also be divided. Beach wormwood attracts bees and butterflies, especially the American Painted Lady.

Harvesting: Beach wormwood can be poisonous in large doses, and should be used with care.

Seed Saving: As soon as the round flowers begin to turn brown, the seed will develop. Shake the entire stalk over a container to remove the ripe seed; the process may have to be repeated as more seed ripens. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Western Sagebrush, Field Sagewort, Wild Wormwood, Threadleaf Sagewort

Latin Name: Artemisia caudata

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 250,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/16 Oz Mylar (1.77g) $4.80 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $6.00 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $12.00 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $48.00 Sold Out
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $180.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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A hardy plant, Beach Wormwood thrives in sand dunes, beaches, and dry prairie soil. Its genus name, "Artemisia," comes from the Greek legend of Artemis, who so appreciated the virtues of this family of plants that she endowed it with her own name. Native Americans have made extensive use of the entire plant, using it for medicinal purposes ranging from the common cold to tuberculosis. The leaves are thought to contain a small amount of the substance known as thujone, which has healing properties when applied topically. The foliage of this plant also provides fodder for small animals and birds.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow on the surface of the soil in late fall or early spring, and thin or transplant the seedlings to 24-36" apart. To start the seed indoors, sow on the surface of a flat; keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination. Transplant the seedlings as soon as they grow big enough to handle safely.

Growing: These plants thrive in full sun and dry, sandy soil. They do not need watering, since they tolerate drought well. Since this plant is a short-lived perennial, its life can be prolonged by removing the stalks as soon as they begin to flower. These plants easily reseed themselves, and can also be divided. Beach wormwood attracts bees and butterflies, especially the American Painted Lady.

Harvesting: Beach wormwood can be poisonous in large doses, and should be used with care.

Seed Saving: As soon as the round flowers begin to turn brown, the seed will develop. Shake the entire stalk over a container to remove the ripe seed; the process may have to be repeated as more seed ripens. Store the seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Western Sagebrush, Field Sagewort, Wild Wormwood, Threadleaf Sagewort

Latin Name: Artemisia caudata

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

US Regions: Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 250,000

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Height: 36 Inches

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