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Tussock Bellflower Seeds

Campanula carpatica

  • HOW TO GROW
  • FAST FACTS
  • REVIEWS

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seeds on the surface of the soil and compacting it lightly. Do not cover the seeds, since they need light to germinate; they are best kept moist until germination, which should occur within several weeks. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days before direct sowing. To start the plants indoors, sow the seed on the surface of the soil of a flat; keep the temperature at 65-70 degrees F and the soil lightly moist until germination. As soon as the seedlings develop leaves, thin or transplant them.

Growing: This plant adapts well to rocky or poor soil, and grows best in well drained soil. It should be watered regularly, but too much moisture may cause disease; for best results, water deeply and let the soil dry out before the next watering. For the best blooming, remove faded blossoms to allow for new ones; after the plant has finished blooming, the foliage can be trimmed back by one third to tidy its growth and prevent reseeding. After several years of growth, these plants can be divided. This plant attracts butterflies and bees, and makes a lovely addition to rock gardens.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut the stems just when they have begun to bloom. Place them in water immediately.

Seed Saving: Since the tiny seed pods on the stalk will ripen at different times, the seed will need to be harvested over period of time. Shake the entire plant over a container to remove the seed that has ripened, repeating the process every few days until all the seed on the stalk has ripened. Store the cleaned seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Carpatic Bluebell

Latin Name: Campanula carpatica

Species Origin: Central and Eastern Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Mountain, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 350,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Height: 12 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers

Size Price Quantity
XL Mylar Packet (~2000 Seeds) $2.50 -+
1/4 Oz Mylar (7.09g) $5.40 -+
1 Oz Mylar (28.4g) $8.80 -+
1/4 Lb Mylar (113g) $35.20 -+
1 Lb Mylar (454g) $132.00 Sold Out
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DESCRIPTION

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Tussock Bellflower’s species name, “carpatica,” refers to its origin in the Carpathian Mountains; this mountain range extends across the central and eastern regions of Europe. Though it appears delicate, this plant adapts well to many environments; it also makes a good container plant because of its neat, rounded growth. Unlike many varieties of campanula, Tussock Bellflower has a subtle, sweet scent.


HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall, planting the seeds on the surface of the soil and compacting it lightly. Do not cover the seeds, since they need light to germinate; they are best kept moist until germination, which should occur within several weeks. For spring planting, mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 30 days before direct sowing. To start the plants indoors, sow the seed on the surface of the soil of a flat; keep the temperature at 65-70 degrees F and the soil lightly moist until germination. As soon as the seedlings develop leaves, thin or transplant them.

Growing: This plant adapts well to rocky or poor soil, and grows best in well drained soil. It should be watered regularly, but too much moisture may cause disease; for best results, water deeply and let the soil dry out before the next watering. For the best blooming, remove faded blossoms to allow for new ones; after the plant has finished blooming, the foliage can be trimmed back by one third to tidy its growth and prevent reseeding. After several years of growth, these plants can be divided. This plant attracts butterflies and bees, and makes a lovely addition to rock gardens.

Harvesting: For fresh flowers, cut the stems just when they have begun to bloom. Place them in water immediately.

Seed Saving: Since the tiny seed pods on the stalk will ripen at different times, the seed will need to be harvested over period of time. Shake the entire plant over a container to remove the seed that has ripened, repeating the process every few days until all the seed on the stalk has ripened. Store the cleaned seed in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Carpatic Bluebell

Latin Name: Campanula carpatica

Species Origin: Central and Eastern Europe

Type: Garden Flowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

US Regions: Mountain, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 350,000

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 4 Weeks

Germination Ease: Stratify 4 Weeks

Height: 12 Inches

Uses: Cut Flowers

Reviews